lastPost

PRACTICAL RAILWAY ENGINEERING

 PRACTICAL RAILWAY ENGINEERING

PRACTICAL RAILWAY ENGINEERING




In medieval times people mostly travelled by foot or horseback and any form of transportation was mainly for moving goods. The first railways were laid down in the seventeenth and eighteenth century for horse drawn trains of wagons in collieries and quarries. These ‘hauling ways’ initially had a surface of stone slabs or timber baulks which soon proved unsatisfactory as the loads carried inevitably grew heavier.

As the Industrial Revolution progressed, the idea was developed further by adding cast iron or wrought iron plates to reduce wear on the wooden baulks. This evolved further to iron edge rails enabling the use of flanged wheels for the first time.

By the time steam locomotives came on the scene, in the early nineteenth century, wrought iron rails and later steel rails were developed which were strong enough to support these heavy axle loads without assistance from longitudinal timbers.

In essence the track itself, together with its supports, had and still has the basic function of safely transmitting the loads and forces imposed by passing trains to the ground beneath.

Various other civil engineering skills were also involved in the construction of early railways. These included the building of bridges, tunnels and gravity walls as well as extensive earthworks and drainage.


DOWNLOAD :- HERE
Comments
No comments
Post a Comment



    Reading Mode :
    Font Size
    +
    16
    -
    lines height
    +
    2
    -