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Computational Geomechanics

 Computational Geomechanics

Computational Geomechanics


Our first text on this subject Computational Geomechanics with Special Reference to Earthquake Engineering was published 23 years ago and has been out of print for much of the past decade. It was the first book of its kind having as the main topic Computational Dynamic Aspects of Geomechanics which obviously comprise statics also. In the intervening period, there was a rapid expansion in the research and practical applications of these types of problems, which has prompted us to write this new and thoroughly updated version.

It contains not only the results of research carried out at our four institutions but also reports on the work done elsewhere. The chapters from the previous edition have been extensively updated and new chapters have been added to give a much broader coverage of recent research interests. The Preface to the first edition was written by the Late Professor Oleg Cecil Zienkiewicz. Its validity is still fully conserved today. So, we reprinted large parts of it.

Although the concept of effective stress in soils is accepted by all soil mechanicians, practical predictions and engineering calculations are traditionally based on total stress approaches. When the senior author began, in the early seventies, the application of numerical approaches to the field of soil mechanics in general and to soil dynamics in particular, it became clear to him that a realistic prediction of the behavior of soil masses could only be achieved if the total stress approaches were abandoned. The essential model should consider the coupled interaction of the soil skeleton and of the pore fluid.

 Indeed, the phenomena of eakening and of “liquefaction” in soil, when subjected to repeated loading such as that which occurs in earthquakes, can only be explained by considering this “two-phase” action and the quantitative analysis and prediction of real behaviour can only be achieved by sophisticated computation.


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